October 28th, 2021 Meeting

When?
October 28, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA

Speaker TBD

Meeting Information

Ariocarpus, Adenium are the mini show plants

Cactus: Ariocarpus

Ariocarpus is a genus of cactus found mostly in south Texas and Mexico. The taxonomy of the genus is somewhat confused, but there are about seven recognized species. The plants are very unusual looking as far as cactus go because of the stacked spineless tubercules. A large portion of the plant is underground in the form of a large taproot. As the plant matures a wooly area forms at the apex, and that is where the beautiful white to dark pink flowers emerge from, usually in the fall. Because of over collecting, the Ariocarpus genus is very endangered in its natural habitat.

Succulent: Adenium

Not to be confused with Adenia, Adenium, is a genus of plant in the Apocynaceae family, which also includes Plumeria, and Pachypodium. There are 5 species, mostly found in southern Africa, and the island of Socotra. The common name Desert Rose refers to the beautiful, mostly light pink to red flowers, although some nursery cultivars produce yellow and orange flowers.

Not only does Adenium have beautiful flowers, but the base of the plant swells into a nice caudex as it grows, making the genus very desirable to succulent collectors. The sap from the plant is highly toxic, and is used as an arrow poison in its native habitat.

Learn more about our Mini-Show Guidelines

When?
October 28, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA


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September 23rd, 2021 Meeting – Gunnar Eisel

When?
September 23, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA

About The Speaker: Gunnar Eisel

Gunnar Eisel
Gunnar Eisel’s interest in cacti and succulents can be traced back to his childhood infatuation with photographing night-blooming cereus flowers and a few unfortunate encounters with opuntia glochids. His interest in cacti became intensified through many annual trips to the Anza-Borrego desert.

Born and raised near Heidelberg, Germany, Eisel has taught music at CSULA, CSUF, Whittier College Fullerton College and Citrus College. He recently retired as a full-time music theory and history of music professor at Citrus College in Glendora, CA where his students were occasionally subjected to his rantings regarding cacti and succulents.

An avid C&S collector, he serves as Executive Director of the Cactus and Succulent Society of America (CSSA) and President of the San Gabriel Valley Cactus and Succulent Society.

From the Windowsill to the Poor House: Building and Managing a C&S Collection

Gunnar Eisel will explore why we collect and what we collect, types of collections, building and “right-sizing” your collection, do’s and don’ts of managing your collection, a few example collections, pest control, current trends, and innovations.

Meeting Information

Grafted Cactus, Stapeliads are the mini show plants

Cactus: Grafted Cactus

A grafted cactus is basically one species of cactus sliced off its own rootstock, and then grafted onto another species of cactus whose top portion has been removed. There are a number of reasons why this is done. The most common reasons are if the desired plant lacks chlorophyll, grafting it onto another cactus will help the one lacking chlorophyll to survive and hopefully thrive. Another common reason cactus plants are sometimes grafted is that some plants naturally produce a weak root system. If that plant with the weak root system is grafted onto a plant that is a more vigorous grower, that will help the grafted plant to grow and thrive.

Astrophytum 'Cloud'

Astrophytum ‘Cloud’

Succulent: Stapeliads

Stapelia, and a few closely related genera make up the Stapeliads. Most of these plants are low growing stem succulents from Africa, with most of the species in South Africa. They usually form mats of soft, fleshy, green, or grey green stems. A distinguishing characteristic of the genus are the flowers. Most species produce somewhat strange looking, sometimes hairy flowers that have a very offensive rotting flesh type odor, the reason for that is that these plants are usually pollinated by flies.

Huernia schneiderana

Huernia schneiderana

Learn more about our Mini-Show Guidelines

When?
September 23, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA


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August 26th, 2021 Meeting

When?
August 26, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA

Growers Panel

In lieu of a speaker, we will have a panel of growers who will show and describe plants, and answer any relevant questions.

Ed Read
@rad_flora
Welwitschia, Adenium, Bursera, Boswellia.

Doug Stone
Euphorbia obesa group and Astrophytum.

Brit Davis
@britsgarden
Aloe hybrids and Myrtillocactus geometrizans forms.

Rei Sales
@cacti4me
Medusoid euphorbia group

Tommy Goodkin
@tg.plants
Adenia ballyi, A. aculeata, Dorestenia gypsophila, Jatropha marginata, Commiphora sp eyl.

Daniel McInnis
@dnlmcinnis
Oxalis gigantea, Corallocarpus bainesii, Euphorbia japonica, Ceropegia fusca.

Craig Fry
canddplants.com
Genus Adromiscus and Ariocarpus.

Meeting Information

Astrophytum, African Euphorbias are the mini show plants

Astrophytum
Astrophytum is a genus of cactus with six recognized species. Most species are found in Mexico with the exception of A. asterias, which also can be found in Texas.

A distinguishing characteristic of the genus are the tufts of white hair or flocking on the plants body, sometimes almost completely obscuring the stem. Some members of the genus start as somewhat globular plants, but as they age they become columnar, up to 1.5 meters tall. A few species are armed with spines, but most species in the genus have no spines at all. The flowers are yellow, or yellow with a reddish center, and are produced throughout the spring and summer.

African Euphorbias
Euphorbia is a very large genus of plants with the common name spurge. This diverse genus contains about 2000 species and can be found almost world wide. A distinguishing characteristic of the genus is that most plants produce a white latex sap when cut or injured. This sap can be mildly irritating to highly toxic depending on the species. Some species look very similar to cactus plants, with their fierce spines and branching succulent stems.These tend to be the species collectors like to grow.

This genus contains very small ground cover type plants, as well as giant branching trees many meters tall, and all sizes in between.

This month we will limit our Mini Show to Euphorbia from the African continent.

When?
August 26, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA


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July 16th, 2021 Meeting – Karen Zimmerman

When?
Friday, July 16th, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA

About The Speaker: Karen Zimmerman

Karen Zimmerman
I am the succulent propagator for the Huntington Botanical Gardens’ Desert Collections, a huge and diverse potted succulent collection outside of the public gardens. I care for these plants as well as propagate them. I have worked at the Huntington for 20 years.

I’ve always been drawn to growing plants. The first plants I grew from seed were pine trees. A small local nursery gave my best friend and me an envelope of pine seeds, and I can still remember the deep excitement and awe when they germinated! We were 10 years old.

I still get that same excitement when a batch of new aloe hybrid babies germinate. It’s even better when they start to develop some character, often very early with the first true leaf. Despite careful breeding for specific traits such as color, size or toothiness, unexpected anomalies can appear in any breeding, especially given how complicated these aloe hybrids have become with generations of species and crosses in the mix. The standouts are, of course, the ones I crave!

Photography is another great love of mine, and I find it pairs well with horticulture. It is easy to overlook small details, and you can really see them through a lens up close. I love to share tiny wonders.

Program Topic – Aloes On My Mind: Exploring Aloe Hybrids One Generation at a Time

I start with an overview of the genus aloe; distribution and diversity of species. I talk a little about the work of hybridizers up to the present, with a special mention about Kelly Griffin, my inspiration to try my hand at it.

I show parent plants and offspring, some that became good enough to name and distribute, and others that became disappointments.

Then I showed some promising babies and future possibilities.

Meeting Information

Echinocactus, Pachypodium are the mini show plants

Echinocactus
Echinocactus is a genus of cactus which, along with Ferocactus make up the North American barrel cacti. Echinocactus species range from small to very large, massive barrel shaped plants. Most species in the genus are very heavily spined, and also produce attractive flowers. They can be found from the desert southwest United States, into Mexico. Some of the species are very popular with cactus growers and collectors. The Golden Barrel, Echinocactus grusonii is probably one of the most well know cactus species.

Pachypodium
Pachypodium is a genus of succulent, spiny shrubs and trees in the family Apocynaceae, which also includes Adenium, and Plumeria.

There are about 25 species of Pachypodium found in Madagascar, and Southern Africa. Some species can grow very large, up to 8 meters. One of the most distinguishing characteristics of the genus is the bottle shaped base of the plant, which is usually very spiny also. The flowers are usually produced in the fall, and can be very attractive.

When?
Friday, July 16th, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA


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June 24th, 2021 Meeting – Rob Roy McGregor

When?
Thursday, June 24th, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA

About The Speaker: Rob Roy McGregor

Rob Roy MacGregor
I started collecting plants about 20 years ago. At first it was collecting from the local nursery in San Felipe in Baja Norte California so I could plant them around a friend’s property in Puertecitos Baja California. Then 15 years ago I bought my home in Riverside and proceeded to remove the grass in my ½ acre backyard and install rocks and cacti. The front yard soon followed, receiving an aloe and rock remodel. After those first couple of years I began to meet people that would change my whole outlook on cacti and succulent plants. It was at this time I ran into a person whom I would later call my mentor. He took the time to instill in me the drive to learn correct terminology and spelling of plants.

He also taught me to take a more scientific approach of gathering information. It was this approach that I call “playing with my plants” which gave me the willingness to do what I have done to plants, in the name of further education.

Program Topic – Mojave National Preserve

On the southeastern border of California lies 1.6 million acres that make up the Mojave National Preserve. Of the 4 deserts that exist in North America, 3 are present within this Preserve, the Mojave, the Great Basin, and the Sonoran deserts. Over the course of multiple excursions throughout various seasons I have explored the Mojave Preserve to view succulent plants in habitat. Treks to the Mojave National Preserve are one-day trips that are inexpensive, contain accessible hot spots with a variety of succulent plants and geological phenomena. The intent of my talk is to demonstrate examples of exploring natural habitats in our own backyard that anyone with a day or two could experience, whether it’s the Mojave National Preserve or our other desert wonders.

Meeting Information

Melocactus, Adenia are the mini show plants

Melocactus
Melocactus is a genus of cactus with about 30 plus species. Most are from South America, but some species live in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. One of the distinguishing features of the genus is the cephalium produced at the apex of mature plants. The cephalium is where the flowers and later the small pink edible fruit are produced. This structure continues to grow and elongate as the plant ages.

Melocactus are very popular amongst cactus collectors.

Adenia
Adenia is a genus of plants in the family Passifloraceae, which also contains Passionflowers, but don’t think of Adenia as edible because some members of the genus are highly poisonous, and contain some of the most potent plant toxins known.

The genus contains about 100 species, and many are desirable to collectors because they are pachycauls and develop a beautiful swollen caudex as they mature.

When?
Thursday, June 24th, 2021
Social time starts at 7:00 pm
Meeting starts at 7:30pm

Where?
Anaheim United Methodist Church
1000 State College Blvd
Anaheim, CA

Refreshments will be available.


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Summer Mini Show Results

Unfortunately due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, OCCSS will not be able to meet in person this August. We will not be meeting in September and it is unlikely we’ll be able to meet again until 2021. We’ll keep you posted.

In the meantime, take a look at our Summer Virtual Mini-Show! Thanks to all who participated! Special thanks to Alden Norris for organizing and Gary James for being our Show Judge.


Parodia schlosseri


Advanced Cactus Winner
Alden Norris
Parodia schlosseri


Notocactus scopa


Intermediate Cactus Winner
Kathy and Jeff McNair
Notocactus scopa


Notocactus magnificus


Beginner Cactus Winner
Rei Sales
Notocactus magnificus


Faucaria sp.


Beginner Succulent Winner
David Domash
Faucaria sp.


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August Meeting Canceled

Sorry to say we still cannot meet due to ongoing pandemic. We do have the results of our Virtual Mini-Show and we’ll have them posted here very soon.

The CSSA is hosting A Zoom event with Tom Glavich on September 5.

Heres the info:

CSSA Webinar: Saturday, September 5 at 10:00 a.m. PDT
Tom Glavich : Mutant Cacti and Succulents
 

Join us Saturday, September 5 at 10:00 a.m. PDT for the 9th in a series of webinars featuring Cactus and Succulent experts from around the world.

Tom Glavich is a long-time grower of succulent plants. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Cactus and Succulent Society of America and is currently the co-chair of the Inter-City Cactus and Succulent show and sale, one of the largest C&S shows in the world. He is the author of the Beginner’s Guide to Succulent Monocots, and the Beginner’s Guide to Succulent Dicots. He is a frequent contributor to the CSSA Journal and an active member of several Los Angeles area Cactus and Succulent Societies.

This webinar is a look at mutant cacti and succulents, with an emphasis on the genetic changes and their impact on the appearance of crests, monstrous and variegated cacti and succulents. A survey of typical and unusual forms will be followed by a short introduction of cultivation and propagation.

To register for the webinar in advance Click here
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email.

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SUMMER SALE CANCELED

Sadly, due to the ongoing situation with Coronavirus, we will not be having our regular July Cactus and Succulent sale.

Watch this space for the results of our Virtual Mini-Show!


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Meetings Canceled for April, May 2020

Dear OCCSS Members,

I hope this message finds you and yours safe and healthy. We are hanging in there at my house.

As you may have anticipated, there will be no club meeting in April. Your Club Board met this weekend via Zoom. Since it is so uncertain as to what will be happening in May as far as the stay-at-home order, we decided it would be best to cancel the May meeting as well. It seems unlikely things will be back to normal that soon. At this point, we hope to have a regular meeting in June as well as our Summer Sale in July.

Many of us have more time on our hands to baby our plants, so we thought we’d organize a Virtual Mini-show in the month of May. We’ll ask for photos of your Plant of the Month and we’ll post a gallery of all the entries, with winners, on the website. So watch your email for info and instructions in the next couple weeks.

I know these are difficult and stressful times. Know that we are thinking about you all as well as the club and hope to see you again soon.

All The Best,
Mary Chittenden

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April and May Meetings Canceled

Due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, the April and May meetings for OCCSS have been cancelled. We hope to see you in June.

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